The Ladybird – A poem by Enid Blyton


I am a terrible person and a worse blogger. At about 11 o’clock last night I realised I didn’t have  blog written for this week, (my excuse, if anyone is interested, is I was writing fanfic) and I couldn’t stay up half the night blogging like I have done before as I start work at 8 on Friday.

So, long story short, here’s a poem for you instead.

The Ladybird

Ladybird, you’re very neat
From tiny head to little feet,
I like your coat of red and black,
I like your clean and shining back.
Do you polish it each night
To make it shine so gay and bright,
Or do you keep a tiny fay
Who rubs it up for you each day?
Beneath your shiny back there lie
The gauzy wings with which you fly,
You’re spreading them – oh please don’t go,
There’s such a lot I want to know.
Your house is burning, do you say?
Ah, well, of course, you mustn’t stay!

Poem originally written for Teachers World No.1576 Aug 9, 1933, taken from The Enid Blyton Poetry Book, 1934.

A ladybird I met on a walk at the Crags of Lundie.

A ladybird I met on a walk at the Crags of Lundie.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Nature, Poetry and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to The Ladybird – A poem by Enid Blyton

  1. Francis says:

    Lovely poem! If you are terrible, Fiona then I’d hate to think what I am!
    Francis

    Like

    • Anonymous says:

      it is a very lovely poem it helps me in studying about the variations and history of a bird. it is the most marvellous work of enid mary blyton

      Like

    • Jayesh mathur says:

      it is a great work done by enid mary blyton. i like and loves the poem very much because in the world there are some people who write about ladybird. because ladybird is a female clever insect. helps all the one insects who is in problem.

      Like

  2. Pingback: ‘The Ladybird’ by Enid Blyton | Poetry in Surrey Libraries

  3. Bridget Cosgrove says:

    I cannot find it so I shall say it is I learnt it, at the age of about four.
    One day a pixie small,
    Sat on a toadstool under a wall,
    Doing his work with a cross nibbed pen,
    When a ladybird walked by, and then,
    Suddenly his pen gave a splutter and scratch, and sent all over his book a patch,
    Of inky blots and some of them fell,
    Splash on the ladybirds back aswell.
    Goodness me it’s beginning to rain she cried,
    And scurried off down the lane.
    But she never guessed that her pretty spots, came from the pixies inky blots.
    And it might upset her if she knew. So please don’t tell her whatever you do.

    Don’t know if it’s correct. I’m 70 now.

    Like

    • fiona says:

      Hi Bridget, that’s a lovely poem. Many people seem to have learned Blyton’s poems off by heart as children and still remember them many many years later.
      Blyton wrote several poems about ladybirds. A couple even mention spots in their titles:
      Why Ladybirds Have Spots on Their Wings
      from Modern Teaching in the Infant School (Vols. 1-4) (The Home Library Book Company 1932)
      The Ladybird’s Spots
      from The Piper Poems – First Series – Book 1 (The Gregg Publishing Company 1933)
      The Ladybird’s Spots
      from News Chronicle Boys’ and Girls’ Story Book No. 2 (News Chronicle 1934)
      The Ladybird’s Spots
      from The Red Pixie Book (George Newnes 1934)
      The three titled The Ladybird’s Spots may be the same poem published in different places. I don’t have copies of any of these titles so I’m afraid I can’t confirm if your poem is any of these. I will ask on the Enid Blyton Society Forums, though, as someone may recognise it.

      Like

    • fiona says:

      I have had some luck!

      Here is the poem – and you were very very close to being correct.

      Long ago when a pixie small
      Sat on a toadstool under a wall,
      Doing his sums with a cross-nibbed pen,
      A ladybird hurried by – and then
      The pixie’s pen gave a splutter and scratch
      And sent all over his book a batch
      Of inky blots – and some of them fell
      Splash on the ladybird’s back as well!
      “Goodness me, it’s beginning to rain!”
      She cried, and scurried on down the lane,
      And never guessed that her pretty spots
      Came from the pixie’s inky blots!

      It does appear in both The Piper Poems – First Series – Book 1 (The Gregg Publishing Company 1933) and News Chronicle Boys’ and Girls’ Story Book No. 2 (News Chronicle 1934).

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s